Highlights on computing overtime pay under Fair labor standards act.
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Highlights on computing overtime pay under Fair labor standards act. by United States. Employment Standards Administration. Wage and Hour Division.

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Published by Dept. of Labor, Employment Standards Administration, Wage and Hour Division in [Washington] .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Overtime -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesWH publication ; 1200, WH publication -- 1200.
The Physical Object
Pagination10 p. ;
Number of Pages10
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17820813M

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New: Interactive Handy Reference Guide to the Fair Labor Standards Act (PDF) (For best printout, see the PDF version.) Revised September The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) establishes minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping, and child labor standards affecting full-time and part-time workers in the private sector and in Federal, State, and local governments. Most employers must pay the majority of their employees overtime pursuant to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). However, there are some categories of employees that qualify for Fair Labor Standards Act exemptions from overtime. Section (b) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) provides for several exemptions from its overtime requirements.   Start Preamble Start Printed Page AGENCY: Wage and Hour Division, Department of Labor. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA or Act) generally requires that covered, nonexempt employees receive overtime pay of at least one and one-half times their regular rate of pay for time worked in excess of 40 hours per workweek. In the years that followed, some private employers instituted similar standards, often under pressure from employee unions. The Fair Labor Standards Act of first set a national minimum wage standard, as well as a requirement that nonexempt employees be paid overtime for work hours that exceeded 44 per week (later amended to 40).

Final Rule: Fluctuating Workweek Method of Computing Overtime under 29 CFR ; News Release [05/20/]: U.S. Department of Labor Announces Final Rule To Expand Access to Bonuses for American Workers; Fact Sheet # Fluctuating Workweek Method of Computing Overtime Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) / “Bonus Rule” Final Rule. The Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”) is the federal law governing wage and hour requirements for employees. Pursuant to the FLSA, employers must pay employees a minimum wage and compensate them for overtime at times their regular rate of pay for any time worked exceeding 40 hours in a workweek unless those employees are exempt from the requirement. Although a logging company paid its workers an hourly wage during meal and commute times, that time was improperly included in the calculation of penalties for overtime violations under the Fair.   Our prior post raised questions about how to calculate a non-exempt employee's pay under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act for the timeframe during which the employer adopts a different workweek.. When the FLSA workweek is changed, the period in which the conversion occurs typically involves hours worked falling within, or overlapping, both the new and the old workweeks.

to the Fair Labor Standards Act The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) establishes minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping, and child labor standards affecting full-time and part-time workers in the private sector and in federal, state, and local governments. The Wage and Hour Division (WHD) of . The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) establishes minimum wage, overtime pay, recordkeeping, and youth employment standards affecting employees in the private sector and in Federal, State, and local governments. Covered nonexempt workers are entitled to a minimum wage of not less than $ per hour effective J The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) was enacted to create two employee classifications to deal with minimum wage and overtime compensations; those employee classifications are exempt and non-exempt employees. The FLSA treats minimum wage and overtime provisions differently based on the classification of the employees. For covered, nonexempt employees, the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires overtime pay (PDF) to be at least one and one-half times an employee's regular rate of pay after 40 hours of work in a workweek. Some exceptions apply under special circumstances to police and firefighters and to employees of hospitals and nursing homes.